Over the last 10 years Linkedin has become a tool for branding yourself, which is why it has never been so important to build and maintain your personal profile on the social platform. Since the professional network is now a virtual CV, a comprehensive networking site and a place to be found, keeping your LinkedIn profile polished and up-to-date is essential.

If you don’t have a LinkedIn profile you could be missing out on opportunities. Making sure you and your brand are visible is good business practice, so having a completed profile with the right keywords for search will give you more opportunities.

Tips for keeping your LinkedIn profile updated

1) Establish your profile
With over 277 million members worldwide and the world’s largest professional networking tool, assume that every person in business has a LinkedIn profile. If you don’t have a presence on the channel, will you be taken seriously? Creating a profile is quick and easy to do, so there is no reason why you shouldn’t be on it and ready to connect with other professionals across various industries.

2) Make yourself searchable
If someone is looking for you and searches for your name on Google, your LinkedIn profile is likely to show up in the first or second spot of the first page results. Make sure the URL of your profile is personalised to your name, as this will help your Google profile ranking status.

3) Monitor what you reveal about yourself
Many people use LinkedIn as a search tool so it gives you the opportunity to control what they discover about you. From your account, others can discover your strengths and more about your business brand; are you aware who is searching for you? This can be anyone, from those who you may be having a meeting with, to prospective employers, managers or even a competitor.

4) Follow and be inspired by influential people
LinkedIn enables you to follow leaders and companies that inspire you and give you a source for creativity and knowledge. By staying on top of what is happening in your industry this also gives you added credibility and authority on both a personal and business level. Keep an eye out as to what these influential people and brands have to say on LinkedIn to help you stay ahead of the game.

5) Get involved in conversations
It’s easy to lose touch with business contacts, which is where LinkedIn comes in and allows you to keep your contacts no matter where they are. You may want to think about expanding your audience by joining groups, post thoughts and comment on posts throughout your news feed to spark conversation with like-minded people, helping to build new relationships.

6) Manage your network
Thanks to tags and being able arrange your contacts into groups, making it easier for you to communicate, LinkedIn provides an efficient away to manage your network. Think of the platform as being your database of contacts, your own CRM system so when you change jobs there is no worry about losing contacts as you will have them readily available.

7) Use it to promote yourself
LinkedIn provides one of the best platforms to increase your own visibility and credibility, so think of it as your personal branding platform, highlighting and showing off your strengths and experience (without being too confident!).

8) Don’t forget the visual elements
Add videos and images in your summary and experience fields to help develop a compelling picture of who you are. Visuals are more likely to grab peoples’ attention as opposed to a text-heavy page, plus this gives you the opportunity to stand out from the crowd.

Who is on LinkedIn in the UK?

Back in March 2014 the platform revealed a blog containing a breakdown of its user demographics in an infographic when it hit a 15 million UK member milestone:

15-million-linkedin-members-in-uk-1-638

Get connected with us!

Check out our LinkedIn company page for updates, news and blogs on the business insurance world. If you need some assistance with your LinkedIn company page or other social media services, why not get in touch with Manchester-based digital marketing agency, The Media Octopus?